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5 Crazy Big Handguns

The world of guns is very similar to that of male bodybuilding. All kinds of volatile chemicals are pushed into and stretched to the limit of iron to give it explosive force and a striking aesthetic presence. We explore 5 Crazy Big Handguns in this blog. The human obsession with disproportionately large firearms has only grown as the demand for “more stopping power, and a bigger hole” has become the standard and widely accepted trend for judging a weapon’s legitimacy, following the overbuilt directions of steroid-injected weight lifters of recent decades. This tendency has actually driven some weapons developers absolutely insane. It has brought up the point that size does matter regarding weaponry. How large, though, is too big?

5 Crazy Big Handguns

  1. Pfeifer Zeliska 28mm Revolver

The world of guns is very similar to that of male bodybuilding. All kinds of volatile chemicals are pushed into and stretched to the limit of iron to give it explosive force and a striking aesthetic presence. The human obsession with disproportionately large firearms has only grown as the demand for “more stopping power, and a bigger hole” has become the standard and widely accepted trend for judging a weapon’s legitimacy, following the overbuilt directions of steroid-injected weight lifters of recent decades. This tendency has actually driven some weapons developers absolutely insane. It has brought up the point that size does matter regarding weaponry. How large, though, is too big?

  1. WTS .50 BMG (Browning Machine gun Cartridge) Pistol

There is no doubt in my mind that this is the most powerful pistol you could ever honestly use in a firefight. The Germans still make the most considerable, wackiest garbage on the market today, continuing Hitler’s infatuation with enormous train cannons. The.50 Browning Machinegun round was intended to be used against vehicles like tanks, jets, and armoured personnel carriers. In rare circumstances, it may also be utilized by powerful sniper rifles. Given that it is more than twice as strong as the renowned 45-70 government bullet, one can only assume that using a handgun to fire it would be uncomfortable, cumbersome, and hazardous for everyone involved. A.50 calibre BMG bullet will shred or burst a soft target if it strikes it. The enormous. Even after piercing one or two targets, a 50 calibre death monster bullet can continue to travel at an incredible rate of speed for kilometres. It’s not a good idea to shoot it at your typical home burglar unless you don’t mind accidentally pegging a neighbour. Would it frighten anyone? Yes. Would they try to flee? Yes. Would you be able to write down the grocery list with your right hand after firing? Doubtful.

  1. Magnum Research 45-70 Government Hand Cannon

Contrary to what some individuals would claim, there are variations on the typical 45-70 government load. Others feel like you pushed the pin on a bomb and forgot to let go, while some feel like a jackhammer. The “Hand Cannon” gives you the satisfying sensation of holding a grenade. It is a weapon that should never be discharged by an innocent person, or by anybody else for that matter. In every sense of the term, it is entirely impractical. Some types are too long to use one-handedly (safely or efficiently), measuring over two feet.

  1. Colt 45-70 Peacemaker

Some genius decided that the.45 calibre Colt Peacemaker, John Wayne’s go-to weapon, did not “have adequate stopping power” in the 1970s. Given that firing the typical.45 calibre ammunition feels similar to smacking a brick wall. It is incomprehensible how anybody could have reached this conclusion. However, American engineers found a technique to increase the size and power of this rifle. Thus, the 45-70 load was first created for use in infantry and/or “buffalo” rifle and then made its way into the world of modern handguns.

  1. .50 Caliber Black Powder Wheel Lock Pistol

The history of.50 calibre flintlock or hammerlock handguns span thousands of years. The.50 calibre chambering was required due to the era’s manufacturing requirements. A.50 calibre cartridge has a precise diameter of one-half inch, making it simple for any ammunition or weapon maker to accurately measure and create. Small clamps were made in the form of this ordinary load during those mythical times, allowing any simple metallurgist to melt down a block of lead or steel and generate a projectile for their weapon. It was as simple as using a hole punch from today. When you combine this simple-to-make ball projectile—which is not a pointed bullet but rather a ball that is not rifled—with the ability to use an enormous amount of black powder, you can reasonably take down a horse, much less a man. But remember that you only have one shot, and it will lose a lot of accuracy and speed after travelling more than 15 yards. Why would you need one to defend yourself? No, not at all. In any case, they are treasured collector’s goods.

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